I Is For Identification Tag

  I have in my desk drawer a set of dog tags Will gave me when he deployed. I wore them all the time he was gone. He had his own set he wore. During the Civil War, there was no standard identification system and many soldiers worried they would not be identified or their […]

H Is For Housewife

This image from the Library of Congress titled, “War views. No. 1501, Camp life, Army of the Potomac – writing to friends at home” shows a soldier in the foreground doing some mending.     This is a patriotic Confederate housewife with three different Confederate flags.   Someone certainly put a lot of love into […]

G is for Rose O’Neal Greenhow

G is for Greenhow.   I’m determined to catch up today. Rawr, go me. Rose O’Neale Greenhow is most likely the best-known spy of the Civil War, though I’m not sure the most effective. There was one who operated deep in the Washington machinery who regularly fed information to the south throughout the war. His […]

F Is For Fox And Geese And Other Civil War Games

Well, let’s try this again. I opened up the file to finish it and it was gibberish as in completely unreadable. I have no idea what happened. F is for Fox and Geese. It was a board game played by adult and child alike during the Civil War. One marker was the fox. The others […]

E is for Enfield Rifle

Well, real life and a book nearing completion got in the way, but I’m going to try to get back on track if I can. I’m not sure I can finish as the book beckons and it’s taking priority. At the beginning of the Civil War, the south was woefully unprepared. The governor of Louisiana […]

D is for Dick the Sheep and other Civil War Mascots

Military mascots are nothing new and the Civil war certainly had its share of them. Dick the sheep was adopted by the 2nd Rhode Island. The men were quite fond of Dick and taught him all manner of tricks, but upon reaching Washington they had to make a painful decision. “We took our pet sheep […]

C is for Camilla

You thought I forgot, didn’t you? Oh, no, mon ami.   Surprisingly enough, the English had been keeping a close eye on American shipbuilders for a while. In the mid-1850’s they were particularly scouting out two designers named James and George Steers of the  George Steers and Co. There was a traditional design to yachts […]

B is for Beast Butler

Welcome to day two of the challenge. I had intended to write about “butternut” today, where the term came from and other innovative ways southerners coped with shortages brought on by the blockade, but something reminded me of “Beast” Butler. He was an interesting character who gained international attention with his infamous Order 28. Butler […]

A is For Angel’s Glow

      Gen. Johnston                                                  Gen. Wallace   It was a year into the Civil War. Sumter had been fired on April 12, 1861, the first major battle at Manassas had culminated in an astonishing and undignified rout of Union forces. If anyone was under the still under the assumption it was going to be […]